Posted in Games, Vocabulary Classes

Make or Do: Place Your Bets

betting

 

This is another post in the series of 30 minute activities for moody teenagers. It’s based around a betting game to review make/do collocations.

Tell students that this week we are in the casino. What do people do in a casino?

Try to Elicit some vocabulary: bet, gamble, win, lose etc.

Split the class into groups of 2-3. Tell each group to think of a team name and put them on the board.

Tell each group they have €100 (dollars/pounds etc.) to spend in the casino and that they should spend it carefully. The winning team is the one that finished the class with the most money.

On the board draw pictures of poker chips representing €10 €20 and €50. Tell students that they can bet their money in these three quantities.

Start with a simple example:

I always _____ my homework.

Tell students to discuss whether it is make/do in their groups. They then place their bets using the structure:

We bet €10/€20/€50 on “I always do my homework” – Ensure that they repeat the whole sentences when they place their bets so that the collocation is repeated.

Once everyone has placed their bets you reveal the correct answer. Any team who selected the correct answer doubles their money: a €50 bet wins €100 so that team would now have €150.

Then drill the correct collocation with the whole class.

Note: it’s important that you rotate the team that places their bet first and ensure that the teams bet in order because they will copy each other.

Continue the game using the following sentences:

1. This company _____ business with big corporations. (Answer: does)

2. The young children ______ a lot of noise in class. (make)

3. I need to _____ my make-up before I go out. (do)

4. You need to ______ an effort, if you’re going to pass the exam. (make)

5. John _____ well in his exams. (did)

6. I need to _____ an appointment to see the dentist. (make)

7. My best friend _____ me a favour by helping me move house. (did)

8. I had to ______ a speech in front of the whole school. (make)

9. My Mum always ______ the ironing. (does)

10. You need to ______ a decision about your holidays. (make)

11. I have _____ plans for the weekend. (made)

12. The fresh air will _____ you good. (do)

13. He _____ a promise to help his Mum with the housework. (made)

14. He’s always _____ excuses to avoid doing his homework. (making)

Wrap up

Test the student memory of the collocations with a quiz.

Posted in Conversation Classes, Games, Grammar Classes

Modals of Obligation, Necessity and Prohibition: Pictionary!

Just a quick note…

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Modals of Obligation, Necessity and Prohibition: Pictionary!

This is part of a series of 30 minute lesson plans I have been writing for conversation classes with small groups of teenagers. Each one covers a specific grammar point and features a game to encourage surly teens to use it.

Introduction

Write “rules” on the board. Tell students to tell you all the rules that their school imposes on them and board them all.  Try to elicit the following structures:

Prohibition:

Mustn’t/can’t/not allowed to

You mustn’t run in the classroom. You’re not allowed to use your mobile phones in class. You can’t smoke in school.

Obligation:

Must/have to

You have to study. You have to be at school at 9am. You must bring your gym kit for PE.

Lack of obligation:

Don’t have to (careful with this one, ensure they understand the difference between mustn’t and don’t have to)

You don’t have to come to school on Saturday. Children over 11 don’t have to wear uniform.

 

Once you have brainstormed all the different rules, ask the students this:

Which rules do you follow?

Which rules do you break?

Which rules annoy you the most?

Do any teachers let you break the rules?

 

Pictionary

Print and cut up the handout.

Draw the following picture on the board:

nosmoking

Elicit the prohibition: You mustn’t smoke.

Split the class into teams of 3-4. Tell them they are going to play pictionary. However, some of the rules are a little strange. Give students time to think of a team name and invite the first person from the first team to the board. They have a minute and a half to draw as many rules as they can for their team, for each rule they guess they get 1 point. The winning team is the one that gets the most point after 2-3 rounds. If you run out of rules, get students to come up with new ones for the other teams to draw and guess. Encourage them to make them as strange and difficult as possible.

Here are the rules from the handout:

You mustn’t sleep in your car

 

You have to wear a helmet
You are not allowed to feed the lions.

 

You mustn’t touch the dolphin.
You have to switch off your mobile.

 

You mustn’t play ping-pong when it’s raining.
You have to be in bed at 10pm.

 

You mustn’t speak during the opera.
You have to wear long trousers. You’re not allowed to drink in the computer room.
You mustn’t sing to the monkeys.

 

You’re not allowed to play video games after 11pm.
You have to take your medicine before going to bed. You’re not allowed to go skiing in the dark.
You mustn’t drink the water. You have to have a shower before going in the swimming pool.