Posted in Conversation Classes

Speaking Topic: Could you…?

Image credit: www.popsci.com

Follow me on twitter @RobbioDobbio

This is a speaking topic designed for teenagers that could also be used with adults. It consists of hypothetical questions with “could you…?” for example: “could you live without your mobile?”

Put students in small groups (3/4) or you could make it an open class discussion. Download the powerpoint below.

Could you

Posted in Games, Young Learners

Playing around with tekhnologic’s templates

tekhnologic

Follow me on twitter @RobbioDobbio

Download tekhnologic’s amazing game templates from here. This week I’m going to play jeopardy with my teenagers and a like/dislike boardgame with my young learners. Try out my completed ones below or download the templates yourself and make your own.

like-dislike-boardgame – target language: I like/don’t like/hate/love/don’t mind. Ss in groups role the dice, move round the board and make sentences about the corresponding picture.

jeopardy-trivia-1-Put ss in teams, they roll a dice to decide which category they answer: Sport, art, geography, science, music, literature. They decide how difficult a question they want on a scale of 1-5. They are given the answer to a question, they have to guess what the question is, for example:

Answer: Usain Bolt

Question: Who’s the fastest man in the world?

If they get it right they get the corresponding number of points depending how difficult the question was.

https://tekhnologic.wordpress.com/downloads/

Posted in Conversation Classes, Ice-breakers

Find someone who… Summer holiday edition

Image credit: travelnotings.com

Follow me on twitter @RobbioDobbio

This is my version of the classic “Find someone who…” speaking and ice-breaking activity designed for teenagers for the first class after the summer holidays. I’ve also added a version for adults.

Download the handout here:

Find someone who – teenagers

find-someone-who-adults-edit

Warmer – Guess my holiday

Students get 20 questions to guess where the teacher went on holiday.

Allow students to ask you more questions to find out some information about the holiday.

Main Activity

Project the handout onto the board. Students must circulate, speaking to all their classmates until they have found someone who did all of the listed activities during the summer holidays. When they find someone who has done one of the activities they must also ask them for some details and record them in the details column.

Before starting model past simple yes/no questions on the board:

Went to another continent:

Did you go to another continent?

Also model questions for details:

Where did you go?

What did you do there?

What did you eat?

The winner is the first person to find someone people who have done each of the things on the list or prove that nobody has done them by speaking to everyone.

Handout

Try to speak to everyone in the class. You must find someone who did the following things in their summer holidays.

Find someone who…

Activity Person Details
Went to a different continent
Tried some new food
Went to a summer camp
Had a party
Ate McDonald’s
Tried a new activity
Visited another part of Spain
Saw an amazing monument
Hurt themselves
Didn’t leave Catalonia
Earned some money
Bought some new clothes
Went on holiday without their family
Visited a famous city
Posted in Games

Game: Consequences

Follow me on twitter @RobbioDobbio

Image credit: www.considerthis.net

The old childhood classic retooled for the ESL classroom. All you need is pens and paper.

It’s the last week of term and I need a fun activity to finish on so I’m going for consequences. You can find the instructions in the link below. You will also find a link to lists of personality adjectives which you’ll also need for the game. Have fun!

http://www.wikihow.com/Play-Consequences

https://www.englishclub.com/vocabulary/adjectives-personality.htm

Posted in Conversation Classes

Conversation topic: The best way to…

Follow me on twitter @RobbioDobbio

Image credit: www.cleverprocrastination.com

This is a straightforward conversation topic lesson plan which can be used with both teens and adults and many levels (high A2+). Students discuss the best thing to do in different situations.

You will need the “best way to…” powerpoint:

The best way to

Language

Put the following structures on the board:

Opinion:

  • In my opinion
  • From my point of view
  • As far as I’m concerned
  • I reckon

The best/worst thing to do is…

Agreeing and disagreeing:

Agreeing Disagreeing Ending an argument:
  • We see eye to eye
  • I couldn’t agree with you more.
  • That’s exactly how I feel.
  • You have a point there.
  • I was just going to say that.
  • Absolutely.
  • We don’t see eye to eye
  • I take your point but
  • I tend to disagree with you there
  • I’m afraid I have to disagree with you there
  • I beg to differ
  • That’s not always the case.
  • Let’s just move on shall we?
  • I think we’re going to have to agree to disagree.

Project the powerpoint onto the board and go through the slides. Play devil’s advocate and ensure that students debate each topic thoroughly.

Debates

You could split the class into teams and debate one of the topics. Give each team an opinion, for example “the best way to break up with someone is by text”, and they have to defend that opinion even if they don’t agree with it.

Homework

Have students choose one of the topics raised and write an essay on it; exploring the different ways suggested and reaching a conclusion as to which is the best.

Posted in Games, Vocabulary Classes

Make or Do: Place Your Bets

betting

 

This is another post in the series of 30 minute activities for moody teenagers. It’s based around a betting game to review make/do collocations.

Tell students that this week we are in the casino. What do people do in a casino?

Try to Elicit some vocabulary: bet, gamble, win, lose etc.

Split the class into groups of 2-3. Tell each group to think of a team name and put them on the board.

Tell each group they have €100 (dollars/pounds etc.) to spend in the casino and that they should spend it carefully. The winning team is the one that finished the class with the most money.

On the board draw pictures of poker chips representing €10 €20 and €50. Tell students that they can bet their money in these three quantities.

Start with a simple example:

I always _____ my homework.

Tell students to discuss whether it is make/do in their groups. They then place their bets using the structure:

We bet €10/€20/€50 on “I always do my homework” – Ensure that they repeat the whole sentences when they place their bets so that the collocation is repeated.

Once everyone has placed their bets you reveal the correct answer. Any team who selected the correct answer doubles their money: a €50 bet wins €100 so that team would now have €150.

Then drill the correct collocation with the whole class.

Note: it’s important that you rotate the team that places their bet first and ensure that the teams bet in order because they will copy each other.

Continue the game using the following sentences:

1. This company _____ business with big corporations. (Answer: does)

2. The young children ______ a lot of noise in class. (make)

3. I need to _____ my make-up before I go out. (do)

4. You need to ______ an effort, if you’re going to pass the exam. (make)

5. John _____ well in his exams. (did)

6. I need to _____ an appointment to see the dentist. (make)

7. My best friend _____ me a favour by helping me move house. (did)

8. I had to ______ a speech in front of the whole school. (make)

9. My Mum always ______ the ironing. (does)

10. You need to ______ a decision about your holidays. (make)

11. I have _____ plans for the weekend. (made)

12. The fresh air will _____ you good. (do)

13. He _____ a promise to help his Mum with the housework. (made)

14. He’s always _____ excuses to avoid doing his homework. (making)

Wrap up

Test the student memory of the collocations with a quiz.

Posted in Grammar Classes

Grammar Activity Future Perfect / Future Continuous

mourinho

This is an activity for teenagers to practice:

The future perfect, to talk about completed actions in the future:

By 12 o’clock I will have finished my homework.

The future continuous, to talk about actions that will be on going at a specific time in the future:

At 12:30 I will be walking the dog.

The activity is based around football manager Jose Mourinho’s plans for the day.

Here is the handout:

https://skydrive.live.com/redir?resid=79CFF252BEEA0A7D!245&authkey=!AAMJUCn1Yk4RqsA